Protein Packed Snack for After Volunteering

Healthy diet vegan food, veggie protein sources: Tofu, vegan milk, beans, lentils, nuts, soy milk, spinach and seeds. Top view on white table.
Healthy diet vegan food, veggie protein sources: Tofu, vegan milk, beans, lentils, nuts, soy milk, spinach and seeds. Top view on white table.

In honor of National Volunteer Week in the month of April, we’ve got a protein-packed snack to take along to your volunteer shift and enjoy after the work is all done – the crowd favored trail mix. There is no set recipe for the perfect trail mix because different tastes prefer different elements in their mixed snack, but we’ve got some tips on choosing what to add and how to portion it out.

Trail mix is technically a mix of nuts and dried fruit with chocolate or grains being added sometimes. It is high in protein with roughly 8 grams of protein in a 2-ounce serving. If you’re looking for additional protein, consider nuts like almonds and pistachios over say walnuts and cashews.

Another thing to consider when eating trail mix is the calorie count of your portion. The nuts and other elements tend to have high-calorie counts, so a handful of the mix is a good way to estimate how much to eat at a sitting.

Need some other ideas to make your own special mix? Here are some ideas of things to include along with your nuts and dried fruits.

Seeds:

If allergic to nuts or hesitant to include them, seeds are a great substitute. Try pumpkin, sunflower, sesame, or flax seeds in place of or in addition to the nuts in your trail mix.

Grains:

Grains are good for you as long as you avoid unnecessary sugar and sodium-packed processed cereals. Go for whole-grain cereals like Cheerios or Chex, bran flakes, puffed rice cereal, and even granola.

Spices:

Now that you’ve got the base of your trail mix, add in a little flavor! Try sea salt, curry, ground ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, or some cayenne pepper to pump up the flavor of your trail mix.